Category Archives: Climate Change

People’s Climate Movement–Chicagoland

Join us Today! January 23rd from 3:30 to 5:30

The People’s Climate Movement is calling for 100 hours of action in response to the inauguration. Sierra Club Valley of the Fox is joining nearby Sierra Club groups in a rally at Rep. Peter Roskam’s office to let him know that his constituents and neighbors want action on climate change. If you want to do something NOW to have a voice in our future, come to this rally. We will have speakers, chanting, and marching. Make some signs. Have your kids make some signs.

Action nourishes hope.

January 23 – Monday – 3:30 pm – 5:00 pm
People’s Climate Movement-Chicagoland
Rally at Peter Roskam’s Office
2700 International Drive, West Chicago, IL

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Questions? Email Barbara Hill

Illinois Budget Crisis Threatens Ratepayer Protection and Clean Energy Programs

While the Illinois budget crisis wreaks havoc on social programs across the state, the budget impasse also poses a major threat to three other major funds. These funds, each funded by ratepayers, not tax dollars, that are the primary funding for Illinois’ programs to protect the most vulnerable, lower bills through energy efficiency, and create jobs in renewable energy projects. Each of these funds have been specifically targeted during this budget crisis. We must act together to ensure that these important resources are protected in this time of crisis.

psp take action button2SB3382 and HB5791 will protect our most vulnerable, create good jobs in clean energy, and reduce pollution. SB3383 and HB5971 both ask for full funding and protection for the the Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standards (EEPS) Fund, while SB3383 also asks for full funding and protection for the Low Income Heating and Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP) and the Renewable Energy Resources Fund (RERF).

1. Low Income Heating and Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP) This fund is a mix of ratepayer and federal funds, and helps low income utility customers pay gas and electric bills to avoid the shut-off of service. Funds are also used to help these customers save energy through weatherization projects. More than 300,000 vulnerable Illinois households use LIHEAP to assist with energy costs. This includes seniors, disabled persons and low-income families. LIHEAP is funded by federal funds and a charge on utility bills – no state tax dollars are provided. The program consists of two funds – the Supplemental Low-Income Energy Assistance Fund and the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Block Grant Fund In 2015, the LIHEAP program was targeted for elimination. SB 3383 would protect both LIHEAP funds in Fiscal Year 2017 by appropriating the full amount of anticipated funds collected from ratepayers and received from the federal government to protect our most vulnerable.

2. Renewable Energy Resources Fund (RERF) This fund, held at the Illinois Power Agency, is collected from alternative electric suppliers and is supposedly dedicated to buying renewable energy as part of Illinois’ electric suppliers. Payments from these alternative suppliers are part of their required compliance with Illinois’ Renewable Portfolio Standard, which requires a certain percentage of each supplier’s energy portfolio to come from renewable sources. To date these funds have been used to buy renewable energy credits from newly constructed solar energy projects – directly creating good jobs in Illinois. Both the pending Clean Jobs Bill (HB2607/SB1485) and ComEd’s Future Energy Plan (HB3328/SB1879) depend on RERF dollars for a new low-income community solar program. No state tax dollars are used on these programs. They are entirely collected from electric suppliers. In 2015, $98 million was swept from the RERF. SB 3383 would protect RERF funds in Fiscal Year 2017 by appropriating $120M, the approximate current balance in the Fund, to create jobs in solar energy projects.

3. Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standards (EEPS) Fund The Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard (EEPS) at DCEO is used by ComEd and Ameren to help homes, businesses, and local governments save energy. These projects have lowered electric bills by well over $1 billion in the last decade and created good jobs modernizing and retrofitting homes, businesses, and local government buildings with energy-saving technologies. No state tax dollars are used on these programs. They are entirely collected from ratepayers and used by ComEd and Ameren on energy efficiency projects. In 2015, these funds were targeted for sweeps. SB 3383 would protect EEPS funds in Fiscal Year 2017 by appropriating up to $125M, or the maximum amount collected from ratepayers, to help lower electric bills through energy conservation.

DON’T SWEEP AWAY ILLINOIS’ CLEAN ENERGY FUTURE

Act Now — Support SB 3383 and HB5791

 

Grain Belt Express Can Deliver Clean Energy and Jobs to Illinois

Illinois has a chance right now to create good jobs adding clean energy to our power supply, and we should say yes.   Springfield may be mired in gridlock, but the Illinois Commerce Commission can give the green light to a project that will put women and men to work and turn on the renewable energy projects we need now to reduce carbon pollution.

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The route is not exact; Clean Line continues to work with landowners to make adjustments.

The proposed Grain Belt Express transmission line would bring new renewable wind energy onto the grid in Illinois while creating 1,500 jobs for skilled workers. The Grain Belt Express would be the latest clean energy success story for our economy since Illinois started adding wind and solar to our power grid, and investing in energy conservation. In just a few years, we’ve created over 100,000 jobs in clean energy, saved consumers over $1 billion on their electric bills and reduced the emissions that threaten our health and our climate. It’s a great start, but we can do so much more.

To fully realize the benefits of the clean energy economy, we have to be able to move power from clean energy projects to our homes and businesses. One of the biggest impediments to a meaningful expansion of the wind industry is the lack of transmission infrastructure. The Grain Belt Express would help bring new wind energy projects on line here in the heartland by connecting them with customers who are eager to switch to a cleaner power supply.

Connecting clean energy to power markets will create good jobs here in Illinois, and we have the skilled workforce ready and eager for the job. It will also reduce the pollution that threatens our health and our wildlife, and threatens stronger storms, increased flooding, and our agricultural economy through the impacts of climate change.

With proper care and consideration for people, wildlife and the land the Grain Belt Express can help deliver urgently needed renewable energy to Illinois and other markets. The state, its citizens and its workers will benefit greatly from another clean energy source being delivered to Illinois. The Sierra Club supports the development of renewable energy projects in our state, and urge the Illinois Commerce Commission to give the green light to the Grain Belt Express and a better future for all of us.

Additional information:

Why Transmission?

Economic Benefits of Transmission

Why Clean Energy Transmission?

photo credit: Harvey McDaniel

photo credit: Harvey McDaniel

A lack of transmission infrastructure remains as one of the biggest impediments to a meaningful expansion of the wind industry. Design of the electric grid exacerbates the problem, as the grid was originally built to connect large individual generation units, and deliver the energy they generated to large population centers around the country. Midwestern states like Illinois–which received 4.98% of it’s energy from wind in 2014–have been working to increase investment in and use of renewable energy like wind, but they continue to face the problem of adequate transmission.

transmissionIn much of the Midwest, we still lack the suitable transmission to connect renewable energy resources that are often in rural areas to the larger grid. New investment in the electric grid must go hand-in-hand with renewable energy investment, allowing clean and renewable energy to be delivered to customers across the Midwest. New projects like the Grain Belt Express project must be considered as a way to provide a path from where renewable energy is generated to consumers.

Renewable Energy and Transmission

With the advent of the Environmental Protection Agency’s Clean Power Plan (CPP), utilities and power providers seek out new energy generation to replace carbon-intensive sources, with the overall goal of reducing carbon emissions. For states to comply with the plan, they will need to identify renewable energy resources and insure that those sources have a reliable connection to the electric grid, and that new transmission development keeps up with renewable energy development.

Because the timeline for transmission development can often run much longer—between 5 and 15 years in many cases—than renewable energy generation facilities, planning of new transmission must try to forecast the future needs of the electric grid. According to the Department of Energy’s Wind Vision report, effectively integrating wind energy into the resource mix of utilities will require that sufficient transmission is built out to meet the needs of new or potential renewable energy generation. In fact, lack of transmission has already led to development delays as several proposals have been trapped in the transmission access queue.

The American Wind Energy Association’s Wind Industry Fourth Quarter 2014 Market Report noted that there is currently 65,879 megawatts (MW) of installed wind energy capacity across 39 states and Puerto Rico, and over 12,700 MW of new wind energy generation under construction. In fact, wind energy accounted for 31 percent of all new electricity generation installed over the last five years.

To meet the goals of the Clean Power Plan, states will require access to local and regional renewable energy resources. Without the transmission connections for these resources, states like Illinois will be limited in their options to address the requirements under the Clean Power Plan.

Local Community Input Essential for Proper Siting

Feedback from local stakeholders is one of the most useful tools in the transmission siting and development process. Comments provided by local communities and landowners offer a unique perspective that developers can’t obtain anywhere else. Developers must take the time to gather this feedback and integrate it, using this input to avoid sensitive areas. Likewise, it is important that regulators and state officials take the time to consider the input of local communities when examining these projects, providing a basis for their decision-making.

One specific area where local input is especially helpful is in the avoidance of sensitive areas. Although developers attempt to avoid these areas, sometimes it isn’t possible to entirely route a project around them. Local communities can provide insight into mitigation practices for these areas, or potential alternatives for routs. This is also true for residences and community buildings, which can be overlooked early in the development process. Proximity of transmission lines to these areas is an important consideration that regulators and developers must make, and any final route must reflect such an effort.

The electric power transmission network was not designed to penetrate areas of the Midwest that are brimming with wind energy potential. Planning new transmission to serve these areas is essential to keep pace with new renewable development, and insure that completed projects can deliver power to consumers. However, it is important that these projects are sited in a way that works alongside affected communities and landowners, and achieves an outcome that meets the needs of all stakeholders involved.

Economic Benefits of Clean Energy Transmission

The Grid and Transmission Lines

Statement on Clean Power Plan & Illinois

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Obama Administration released the final version of the landmark Clean Power Plan.

In response, Jack Darin, Director of the Illinois Chapter of the Sierra Club released the following statement:

“The Clean Power Plan is the most significant single action any President has ever taken to tackle the most serious threat to the health of our families: the climate crisis.

“Today marks a new era of growth for affordable and safe clean energy sources that don’t fuel climate disruption and sicken our communities. It is a step towards improving the quality of life for low income neighborhoods and communities of color, which have disproportionately borne the brunt of power plant pollution in Illinois for decades. It is an opportunity to protect what we treasure most here in Illinois; from Lake Michigan to our state’s vital farmland.

“We know we can meet these goals for reducing carbon pollution in Illinois because we’ve already started. Since Illinois started adding wind and solar to our power grid, and investing in energy conservation, we’ve created over 100,000 jobs in clean energy, saved consumers over $1 billion on their electric bills and reduced the emissions that threaten our health and our climate. With a strong state Clean Power Plan, we can build on that success to create good jobs where we need them most, protect ratepayers, and clean the air we breathe. The Illinois Clean Jobs bill is the best way to bring Illinois a clean energy future by ramping up renewable energy like wind and solar to 35 percent by 2030 and cutting energy use through efficiency by 20 percent by 2025. These efforts will save consumers money while bringing clean energy investment to new communities to strengthen local tax bases and create family-sustaining jobs.

“We are especially proud that a President from Illinois is leading America to confront the climate crisis, and seize these opportunities. With so much at stake, it’s time to come together to build solutions to ensure that no Illinois community is left behind as we shift to a clean energy economy. As we work to build a better future for our children and grandchildren, these efforts must include ensuring good jobs and economic vitality in diverse Illinois communities so families can grow and thrive.

“We stand ready and eager to work together on a Clean Power Plan for Illinois that delivers the better future we all want for our families and our future.”

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Quinn/Rauner Debate Climate Change

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During the October 8th Downstate Gubernatorial Debate in Peoria, candidates for Governor were asked about their position on climate change and whether they supported President Obama’s Clean Power Plan.

The question came from Jamey Dunn at Illinois Issues magazine:

Q: States would play a large role in implementing the proposed federal role to cut carbon emissions. Do you believe that climate change is happening and is man-made and what is your take on the Obama administration’s plan to cut carbon given that the state derives most of it’s electricity from coal?

Bruce Rauner: “I believe we need a broad based portfolio of energy options in Illinois and in America. I do not believe that betting too much on any one sector is prudent- we need a broad base and we need energy independence for America and I’d like to see that also for Illinois. I believe we can have renewable energy resources here, we can have and should have further development of our wind farms, of our solar energy- renewable resources. But I also believe we can be prudent in our energy development from more traditional resources. We have incredible energy opportunity in southern Illinois with coal, with oil and gas, with hydraulic fracturing. It can be a massive job creator and tax revenue generator if we have a broad based portfolio of energy options and I would push every capability in that regard.”

Governor Quinn: “I think we have to reduce emissions and I do think we need to take on climate change. The winter we just had- terrible tornadoes this November here nearby and in Washington and other place in Illinois. I think the alarm signals told all of us that severe weather is something we all need to pay attention to and reducing emissions is part of the job for all of us. And since I’ve been governor, our state has erected many many wind turbines across Illinois. I believe in wind energy and solar energy. I’ve been in the roof of the Shedd Aquarium in Chicago where they have solar collectors at real cost. We also have to believe in energy efficiency and we’ve invested in that in Illinois. Our state is the only state not on a cost that is in the top 10 in energy efficiency states in the country and we’ve been able to do that in my time as governor. We’ve invested in energy efficiency- it’s one of the best ways to reduce emissions, help grow jobs. These are clean energy jobs that create good paying jobs for people by reducing the need for energy whenever possible and I think the state of Illinois can be a leader in this area. We have good workers who are well trained”

You can view the entire debate hereentire debate here The question on climate change is the second one in the debate.

IL Leaders Join 160 Midwest Organizations Applauding Obama Climate Action Plan

Today, 160 businesses and organizations from six Midwest states, including Illinois businesses,  religious and health organizations, sent a letter to President Obama thanking him for the Climate Action Plan he laid out in June. The letter emphasized the importance of the President’s directive to EPA to develop carbon pollution standards for existing power plants.

As reminders that climate change is upon us,  the letter cited record flooding in parts of the Midwest this spring, less than one year after devastating drought over much of the region last summer and fall. “We look forward to working with you, EPA, and Midwestern electric utilities to meet this challenge,” the signatories wrote to the President.

Much of the letter is focused on recent extreme weather, adverse health impacts brought about by climate change, and how the region’s low-income communities are especially susceptible to climate change impacts.

“Cutting carbon pollution from large sources will doubly benefit families living with lung and heart disease,” said signer Brian Urbaszewski, Director of Environmental Health Programs for Respiratory Health Association. “Transitioning to energy sources like wind, solar and efficiency will not only reduce global warming over the long term, but will provide immediate health benefits by eliminating major sources of smog and soot pollution now harming millions of vulnerable adults and children across the Midwest.”

In addition, the letter highlights how carbon pollution standards can boost the Midwest’s economy.  “The Midwest can be the world’s leader in manufacturing the clean energy technologies that meet our energy needs and protect the environment for future generations,” says the letter from businesses, health groups, religious groups and community groups from Illinois, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio and Wisconsin.

“Modernizing and cleaning up our nation’s electric grid is one of the greatest economic development opportunities of our lifetime,” said Amy Francetic, CEO of Clean Energy Trust, among the Illinois leaders signing the letter.

The letter stresses the overwhelming scientific consensus that climate change is real and threatens Midwest ecosystems.

” The Chicago Botanic Garden believes that climate change is a real threat to plants and is taking action to help flora adapt to a changing climate and to reduce the impact of the changes.  Both on the Garden’s property and through working with partners, we will advocate for protection of native habitats as well as their management and restoration,” said Sophia Siskel, President and CEO of the Chicago Botanic Garden, who also signed the letter.

“We applaud President Obama for calling for bold action to address the threat of climate change,” said Jack Darin, Director of the Sierra Club, Illinois Chapter.  “We look forward to working with the President and his team to craft climate solutions that protect our health and environment for today, and for future generations.”

A copy of the letter is available here.8.7.13 POTUS Thank you

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